Bend Oregon Real Estate – Buying a New Home

Now is the time to buy a new home in Bend Oregon. The prices of homes in Central Oregon have been going up in value steadily over the past several years. The Multiple Listing Service of Central Oregon reports that home values have almost doubled in the past four years.

Land values have been going up and new construction has been booming for the last five years. Now the market is in a slow down and is being flooded with inventory. Homes are taking longer to sell and builders are being forced to lower their prices.

New home developers and builders were able to sell homes in the past few years before they broke ground. They had buyers waiting in the wings to purchase these homes as soon as the lots were developed and the builder priced the homes. The buyers chose their finish materials and waited for construction to be finished.

The winter of 2006 is going to be the best time to buy a new home in Bend Oregon. The National Association of Realtors reported “In the West, existing-home sales declined 3.1 percent to an annual pace of 1.25 million in September, and were 23.8 percent lower that a year earlier. The median price in the West was $332,000, down 5.1 percent from a year earlier.”

One developer/builder in Bend recently lowered prices $20,000 across the board on all of his homes. He now has eight homes sitting finished. He is also including central air-conditioning, upgraded tile counter tops, a refrigerator and backyard landscaping. These free upgrades and lower prices were not available last year.

As new and used home sales continue to fall and inventories continue to build Bend is starting to look like a candy store for home buyers. The new home market will show some of the best buys because builders have to sell. They cannot afford to sit on millions of dollars of inventory.

As we go into winter and the temperature starts to drop the heat bills start to go up. This increases the holding costs of a developer/builder. Builders are also starting to pay closing costs for a buyer which indirectly gives today’s buyers a better value yet.

Developers are usually large businesses that can afford to sell a few houses at a loss to get them through the winter. One builder has lowered his asking price of one particular home to almost $50,000 lower that the same floor plan sitting vacant down the street. He has several homes finished and sitting vacant and his interest payments continue and now winter heat bills will be adding to his holding costs.

This “buyer’s market” won’t last for long though. Interest rates are still around 6.25 percent and the Federal Reserve just held tight with no interest increase. So interest rates should stay low over the winter.

Gasoline prices are falling and it was just reported by the Bend Bulletin, Central Oregon’s local news paper that “Deschutes County jobless rate sinks To 3.7 percent.” Bend continues to grow. There are good jobs available and people continue to move to Bend.

Bend is also one of the most desirable places to live in the United States. If you live in Bend you can drive 30 minutes west and be in the mountains with great fishing, hunting, hiking and biking. You can drive 30 minutes east and be in the high desert with spectacular mountain views and fresh clear air.

It is said that Bend’s local ski mountain, Mount Bachelor has some of the best powder in the Northwest. Golf magazines also report that Bend is one of the best golf communities in the West. Golf is available for golfers of any budget from inexpensive public courses to luxury private courses.

The Deschutes River runs through the middle of Bend. It is a nationally famous trout stream and also has Steelhead and Salmon runs in its lower reaches. Because Bend is such a great place to live there will always be a demand for new homes.

Local Realtors look for prices to stabilize and start back up next spring. David Lereah, the chief economist for the National Association of Realtors said, “When consumers recognize that home sales are stabilizing, we’ll see the buyers who’ve been on the sidelines get back into the market, and sales will be at more normal levels in the wake of the unsustainable boom that we say last year.”

The next few months will be the best time in a long time to buy a new home in Bend Oregon.

Buying a Home? Watch Out For These Estate Agent Tricks

This is the second in a series of three articles warning home buyers and sellers about the main tricks estate agents use to get hold of your money. These articles are aimed at helping you avoid being fleeced by your estate agent.

Selling to buyers

Although we all know that agents are acting for sellers, many are experts in befriending buyers and getting them to feel that they are on our side, working to help us get the best property at the best price. If you’re buying a property you should be on your guard against several sales traps including the block, stock-shifting, pumping up the price, the spider’s web and the sealed-bid scam.

1. The Block

Of all estate agents’ tricks, the block is probably the one people least expect. Most of us assume agents want to sell properties to us and so it doesn’t occur to us that they may be interested in preventing us from buying. There are several reasons an agent might try to block us from buying a property. The most obvious is that they’ve planned a slash-and-grab for themselves or one of their contacts and so don’t want us to disrupt their plans by buying at a higher price than they’re offering. Another reason may be that the agent has a buyer who is also taking out a mortgage through that agent or an associate mortgage agent. The agent can earn almost as much commission from flogging the mortgage as from selling the property and so may be less interested helping a buyer with cash or who has organised their own mortgage. In both these cases, an agent may withhold our offers from a seller or, if they do pass on our offers, they may discourage the seller from accepting them by suggesting that we may not be in a good position to buy. An investigation by one journalist found that of six offers made to estate agents, only two were passed on to sellers.

2. The stock-shift

Buyers may be looking for their ideal home, but agents can only sell the properties they have on their books. Moreover, they have to shift their stock if they are to meet their sales targets. Unless an agent is lucky enough to have properties that perfectly match buyers’ requirements, the only way they can get their monthly bonus is by convincing buyers to take whatever they’ve got to sell. So the art of a successful agent is to influence buyers to compromise and take what is available rather than hold out for their dream property.

There are various ways of getting buyers to compromise. The easiest is to use fear to push you into making an offer. An agent may tell you that they have the perfect property, that this has just come on the market, but that you’ll have to move quickly before someone else snaps it up. Or if a buyer is hesitating, the agent will use the phantom buyer trick and claim that several other buyers are also interested. To add a little colour the agent may also say that one of the phantom buyers is a cash buyer and therefore in a much better position than you. Or an agent may arrange for several buyers to view a property at the same time. This is intended to make buyers believe that there is competition for the property and can lead to buyers being infected by auction-fever – always a great way to spur them into action and push the price up. Typically an agent will say that prices in the area are going up so if you don’t buy quickly, you’ll end up paying a lot more in a few months time. And there’s the sandwich – here the agent shows a buyer three properties with the first and the third being either unsuitable or out of their range and the middle one being closer to what they want. This helps create the impression in the buyer’s mind that there are few properties fitting their requirements and makes them more open to being fobbed off with something which is reasonably close to what they were looking for.

3. The price pump

Research has repeatedly shown that around 70% of buyers spend on average about 20% more for their homes than they had originally intended. So, whatever a buyer may say to an agent about their price limit, the agent already knows from experience that the large majority of buyers can be squeezed well above this if shown a property they like. The simplest way for the agent to push the price up is to claim that they already have several offers on a property, so if you’re interested, you’re going to have to put in a fairly juicy bid. Or else an agent may use the build-up – show you four or five properties, starting with the cheapest and moving on to the most expensive. Most buyers, when seeing a property they really like, will stretch their financial limit rather than letting the property go to someone else. Another tactic is to show you a home that is way above your financial limit. In comparison, any subsequent properties will seem reasonably priced. Or the agent could use the sneer – take you to an expensive property and then suggest that it’s a pity that you can’t stretch your budget to buy such a perfect home. This is particularly easy if the agent can use buyer’s partner or family to pile on the emotional pressure.

4. The spider’s web

In addition to sellers and property developers, agents have a wide web of people who can help them increase their earnings. For example, if an agent convinces a buyer to use a particular mortgage advisor or supposedly independent financial advisor, on an average loan the advisor will pocket about £2,000 and the agent £1,000 to £1,500. Even if a buyer has finance available, an agent might tell buyers that ‘it’s company policy’ to ensure that all buyers get the best loan deals available and so, whether you want it or not, the agent makes an appointment for you to meet a mortgage salesman with business connections to the agency.

Similarly, an agent will usually get generous kickbacks if they pass buyers onto lawyers and surveyors that they regularly work with. An added advantage of using lawyers and surveyors known to the agent is that they will tend to overlook problems with properties to enable sales to go through. In any town or even areas of a city, most agents, lawyers and surveyors will have worked together in the past and none will want to upset any of the others. So even when a buyer believes their lawyer and surveyor are representing their interests, it’s likely that the lawyer and surveyor will be more sensitive about ensuring continuing a good relationship with the estate agent rather than worrying about the interests of a buyer that they will probably never deal with again. When I began to question both my lawyer and surveyor about things they had apparently ‘overlooked’, the lawyer paid me £6,000 and the surveyor £2,500 – this may have been because they were terribly nice people and particularly liked me; or it may have been because they realised their cosy little arrangement with the estate agent had been rumbled and so were keen to avoid any possibly embarrassing explanations. Any buyer who gets caught in the spider’s web of the agent’s business associates may find it a very expensive experience.

5. Sealed-bid scams

If there are several buyers chasing a property, the seller and agent may ask all the potential purchasers to submit their ‘best and final’ offer in an envelope by a certain date and time with the understanding that the highest bid will be accepted. This is a wonderful way of getting the price up as buyers’ competitive natures can cloud their common sense. But the sealed bid process is open to abuse. For a start, the seller doesn’t have to accept the highest offer – a slightly lower cash offer may be preferable to a higher offer from someone who needs time to arrange finance. Also, once the bids are opened, the agent can easily go back to the bidder with the deepest pockets and suggest that if they increase their offer by a certain amount, then the property is theirs. If they think a potential buyer has access to more money, the agent can also lie about the level of the highest bid or invent a phantom bid in order to push the price higher. Or, if they want to do a slash-and-grab to get the property for themselves, a developer, a family member or friend, then an agent may withhold some bids.